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Starbuck City Council

Starbuck looks at adding a digital sign at corner of Highway 28 and 29

By Zach Anderson
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Starbuck may be going digital at the four-way stop near Petro Plus this spring.
Terry Timmerman of Image Experts, a company out of Hancock and Morris, addressed the Starbuck City Council with an interest to build a 3-foot by 8-foot sign at the adjacent corner from Petro Plus. Timmerman said the land is owned by Jim Riley and in talks with him, Riley is willing to work with Timmerman to put a sign there.
Timmerman said the signs are largely paid for by advertising so it wouldn’t cost the city or residents any money.
Typically he looks for a local sponsor, such as a bank, where people could go to request what they want the sign to display.
Timmerman said he would need approval from both the city of Starbuck and MnDOT to be able to put a sign there.
Swenson said he would like to send the discussion to the planning commission so they can look at the ordinances and make a recommendation to the council. “It will probably be November before we make a decision,” Swenson said.

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Glimpses From The Past

2016 marks 150 years of Pope County. In celebration, the Museum Notes will feature items from all of the newspapers published in Pope County in 1916.

FROM THE GLENWOOD HERALD, THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28, 1916

J.C. Johnson has the distinction of being the first man in the town of Chippewa Falls to erect a silo. He has had a Puffer Hubbard silo erected the past week. The silo was bought from Gandrud and Gordon.

A boulder marking the site of a stockade erected by the pioneer settlers in August 1862, for the defense against the Sioux Indians, was unveiled at Sauk Centre Wednesday afternoon of last week. United States soldiers were stationed in this stockade until the close of the Civil War. Among the soldiers who were on duty at this stockade was George W. Thacker, pioneer resident of this county.

FROM THE POPE COUNTY TIMES, Thursday, September 28, 1916.

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Someplace Safe Working To End Domestic Violence

Every nine seconds in the U.S. a woman is assaulted or beaten. On average, 20 people are physically abused by intimate partners every minute. Taken from the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, those statistics turn the spotlight on an issue that doesn’t always take center stage.

“Domestic violence is an alarming and pervasive problem in our country and in our county,” said Donna Ortendahl, Someplace Safe crime victim advocate. This past year Someplace Safe served at least 2,216 victims and survivors of domestic violence throughout its nine-county service area in West Central Minnesota, including Pope County.

In conjunction with Domestic Violence Awareness Month, observed across the U.S. during the month of October since 1987, Someplace Safe is rallying the community for its annual Walk Against Domestic Violence.

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DNR Dig Reveals Local Finds

DNR dig reveals local finds

Imagine a time when there were no permanent roads or buildings; when the marshes were teeming with wildlife, bison roamed in the prairies nearby, and tribes of people lived out their lives. This sets the scene for what DNR archaeologists found at the fish hatchery in Glenwood last summer. On Sept. 17, curious community members gathered to hear a presentation given by Mike Magner, the lead archaeologist on the excavation site.

The decision to demolish the 1904 superintendent house for the hatchery came at Magner quickly, who had to work fast to beat the construction schedule. Taking note of where previous construction had taken place, Magner was worried that the building of the original house and parking lot might have disturbed the original deposit soil underneath, which is where archaeological artifacts can be found.

“The location of archaeological sites are pretty predictable,” Magner said. A place where people could have access to water, a food source, a high spot for a summer breeze to keep cool, and even an aesthetic area to enjoy the scenery are just a few of the things that indicate where artifacts, or even remains, might be. The hill where the hatchery house stood was a prime location.

In order to figure out if there were artifacts in the area, Magner and fellow archaeologist Stacy Allen conducted shovel tests—a hole about a foot and a half across. Holes dug where the new parking lot would be didn’t turn up any artifacts, but holes near the house and a little further down the hill did. Manger and Allen then turned to larger holes measuring 1 meter by 2 meters.

They ended up finding quite a bit by the time they were done digging. A total of 23 meters of area was dug out, and in those 23 meters, they found 1,143 lithic items (stone), 1,737 ceramic shards, and approximately 12,000 faunal specimens (bones). The plains and forest tribe cultures were both represented in the artifacts, which Magner said would make sense since this area is at the edge of both regions.

The stone items were mainly tools and arrowheads, some dating to about 3,000 years ago. Magner said it is usually hard to tell where arrowheads and tools come from because they are a necessary tool, and there aren’t many variations across tribes. However, by looking at the type of stone each tool is made of, archaeologists can make educated guesses on where the tools came from.

Ceramic pieces are sometimes easier to identify because they have decorative components specific to certain regions. Aspects like bowl shape, decorative edging, and materials used to decorate the pottery can pinpoint where the artifact could have come from. Having other, similar artifacts in the region in question usually cements speculation on location of pottery. The ceramic shards found dated back to possibly 1,500 years ago.

Luckily, there were no human remains found during the excavation. Had there been, it could have become a lengthy process to remove and relocate the remains. The types of bones found consisted of fish, birds, turtles, bison and even a possible bear tooth. The amount of fish bones was prolific, and some of the vertebrae were quite large. Magner was surprised to find bird bones because they are so light and can be crushed easily. Pieces of turtle shell were found, and the bison bones found consisted of lots of knuckles and teeth. The bear tooth however, was not expected. Magner speculated that it might have been a ceremonial item or a gift and was dropped or left at the site, but there would be no way to tell why.

“It looks like people were camping on that hill as far back as 3,000 years ago and probably up until at least 800 years,” Magner said. “Its really nice that we got the opportunity to get out there before they tore it all up.”

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Uganda Visitors Coming To Glenwood

Uganda visitors coming to Glenwood this week

A contingent of dignitaries from the African country of Uganda and the United Nations ambassador for Uganda will be visiting Glenwood this weekend.
The Glenwood Rotary Club was instrumental in setting up the visit of Kintu Nyago, deputy permanent representative of Uganda’s Mission to the United Nations in New York. It was announced recently that Nyago would be accompanied to Glenwood by Iganga District Governor Mr. Kayemba Patrick Gavamukulya and James Luyimbazi, town clerk of the Iganga Municipal Council.

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Glimpses From The Past

 

FROM THE GLENWOOD HERALD, THURSDAY August 3, 1916

The Glenwood Lutheran church will have its corner stone laying ceremonies next Sunday. In the forenoon services will be held at the usual time at the Lakeside pavilion, where Rev. M. Thorson of River Falls, Wis., will speak Norwegian and Rev. H.P. Ausan will speak English. The choir will render several anthems and Mrs. A.M. Rovelstad will sing a solo. After the service, ample time for a picnic lunch will be given. People are requested to bring their lunch baskets. The Ladies Aid will furnish coffee free. At 3 o’clock a mass meeting will be held to discuss several things in connection with the building operations. At 4 o’clock the congregation will march in a body to the new church site. Rev. A.J. Lee, manager of the Glenwood Old Peoples Home will deliver a short introductory address, after which Rev. H.O. Koefod, who for many years served the congregation as its pastor will have charge of the corner stone laying ceremonies. He will be assisted by a number of ministers from the neighborhood. All are cordially invited to attend these services. H.P. Ausan

The Commercial Club will have its first meeting in the new quarters on the second floor of the City Hall next Tuesday evening. This is the regular meeting of the club and as many of the members as possible should be present.


FROM THE POPE COUNTY TIMES, THURSDAY August 3, 1916.

Mr. Stothoff, for a few weeks past the partner of H.J. Metcalf of the Pope County Times, now succeeds him as sole editor and publisher of the paper. The deal was closed this week by which Mr. Metcalf relinquishes his interest in the paper. Rev. Geo. A. Hanna, former editor of the Paynesville Press is serving as reporter for the new editor.


FROM THE STARBUCK TIMES, FRIDAY August 4, 1916

A fire that threatened to wipe out the entire business part of the town started in the elevator owned by Carl N. Nelson at about 9 o’clock Friday evening. When discovered the fire had spread through the elevator and it spread quickly to the coal shed of the Starbuck Lumber Company and Larson Bros. Carpenter Shop. H.O. Jorgenson discovered the fire and gave the alarm. The fire department responded promptly and fought valiantly to control the blaze. Mayor Jorgenson took the precaution to summon the Glenwood fire department, who responded quickly bringing with them a supply of hose and assisting materially in checking the flames. The Cyrus boys also came with their chemicals and helped protect the town from the shower of flames that threatened to start fires everywhere. The Morris fire ladies were also ready to send help. The coal burned all day Saturday and when it was realized that the local water supply was inadequate, the Lowry fire department was called and arrived with additional equipment to help pump water from the river. The fire was finally extinguished Sunday afternoon. Practically the entire male population of the town took a hand in fighting the flames or in watching buildings and keeping the loss down to the lowest possible figures.

J.S. Skoglund has made arrangements with Paul Kleven to have the 11 acres of land on the shore of the lake known as Spring Grove surveyed. Plans for a summer resort are being made and he expects to erect several nice cottages. The fact that this place is on the main road and the railroad passes close by is of advantage and it is thought that arrangements can be made to have the trains stop at this place. Parties from Morris as well as Starbuck are interested and it is hoped that plans will materialize.

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