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Glimpses From The Past

From the Glenwood Herald August 26, 1915

The outside work on the new [Cyrus] bank is fast nearing completion and it is now quite evident that the owners and people of this community will have one of the niftiest little banks in the country. All we need now to Make Cyrus a sure ‘nough metropolis is a nice two story brick hotel building, an up-to-date garage, an electric light plant, water works system, some more cement walks and few minor improvements, all which will be forthcoming at some future date.

The Plymouth Brethren have made extensive improvements on their house of worship in Lowry.  They have constructed a basement under the church, which they will use for Sunday school and other similar purposes. Several hundred dollars have been expended and church and grounds will be improved very much when the work gets done.

Forada beat Lowry 6 to 4 last Sunday in the closest game played on the home grounds this year. The fielding of the local team was far from errorless and they did not seem to be able to hit McClellan safely. This is the second game Lowry has lost in eleven played this year.

At a meeting of the stockholders of the Farmers Elevator Association last Wednesday it was voted to purchase the Atlantic Elevator. They intend to have both houses open during the busy season, because either one is not large enough to handle all the grain. The farmers will take possession of it this week and Robert Hume will be in charge. Mr. Erickson who has been manager for the Atlantic here for several years will go to Sedan where he will run an elevator for the same company.

I.M. Engebretson sold his Ford to Geo. Jurgenson and purchased a new Dodge auto from J.J. Hagstrom.

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Notes From The Capital

Monday, August 24, 2015

paul anderson 150The two committees in the Minnesota House that deal with agriculture will conduct a joint tour this week to view ag-related facilities around the state.  The Policy Committee, which I chair, along with the Finance Committee, chaired by Rep. Rod Hamilton, will be on the road Tuesday and Wednesday to get a first-hand look at turkey processing facilities, the poultry testing lab in Willmar, along with a biodiesel refinery and an ethanol plant.

The first day we’ll visit the Jennie-O plant in Faribault, where workers were laid off during the height of the Avian Flu outbreak earlier this year.  The plant is now ramping production back up, and workers are being called back.  We’ll also swing through Austin for a stop at Hormel before heading to Albert Lea to visit a biodiesel refinery in that city.

After returning to St. Paul that evening, we’ll head out the second day to Willmar for a tour of the poultry testing lab. This facility was granted funding in the bonding bill for an upgrade so testing for the Avian Flu can be done right there in Willmar instead of having all samples sent to the University of Minnesota in St. Paul.  Our tour will also visit the MinnWest Technology campus and the Jennie-O Turkey Store, both located in Willmar.  The last stop Wednesday will be at an ethanol plant in Granite Falls.

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Glimses From The Past

From the Glenwood Herald August 19, 1915

Last Sunday evening the Choral Club, an organization composed of the young people of Starbuck and vicinity rendered the Cantata, Ruth, to a large and appreciative audience in the Fron Church of Starbuck.  The church was crowded to its utmost.  All of Starbuck was out, a large number of the farmers of the vicinity came in their automobiles and a number of auto loads from Glenwood helped to swell the audience.  The solo parts were taken by local people.  Aurthur Hagen sang the part of Boaz, Mrs. O. Opheim the part of Ruth, Miss Englund represented Orpah and Miss Alma Enger, who was also the director, sang the part of Naomi.  The one who perhaps deserves the most of the credit is the director, Miss Alma Enger.  She had the chorus under full control at all times.  The director and the chorus had evidently done hard and careful practice as was evidenced by the results as they appeared to the audience last Sunday night.

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First Annual Scrub Run In Glenwood

First annual Scrub Run honors Dr. Mark Johnson

If you see a contingent of scrub-clad people running along North Lakeshore Drive on Aug. 29, don’t be alarmed—there’s no emergency. It’s simply the route of the first annual Scrub Run/Walk 5K, an event sponsored by Glacial Ridge Health System and inspired by Dr. Mark Johnson. Dr. Johnson served the community as a physician at GRHS beginning in 1990 and passed away in February 2015.

Quinn Jacobs, RN and emergency room nurse manager, said fitness was an important part of Dr. Johnson’s lifestyle, and he encouraged his patients to be active in their daily lives. “He was definitely a role model for healthy behavior,” she said.  “He walked to work almost every day—with his fluffy white dog by his side—and also took advantage of many classes offered through the fitness center.”

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2015 Pope County Fair

2015 Pope County Fair

Wild RideDespite intermittent rain making some mud last Thursday, little ones made tracks to and through the Pope County Fair for Daycare Day. The Children’s Barnyard was a popular stop on the tour of the fair. Petting a goat brought out smiles from Ally Shiffler. Children started off their day with arts and crafts, making a fluffy and colorful sheep with cotton balls and crayons. Other days included Senior Citizen’s Day, Family Day and Hometown Hero Day.

The Miniature Tuff-n-Nuff Rodeo rocked the Grandstand at the Pope County Fair on Saturday evening with barrel racing, bull riding, miniature bareback riding and wild pony races. The younger ages had to ride the bull for six seconds to be scored by the judges.

From turtle races to racing rides on the midway, special events and (of course) fair food, this year’s Pope County Fair had something for everyone to enjoy.
Photo by Starbuck Times

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Artifacts Found On DNR Site

Artifacts found on DNR site
 
About 1,500 years ago, people gathered on the northern shores of Lake Minnewaska to work, rest and share meals—and thanks to a recent archaeological dig, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has the pottery to prove it.
Mike Magner, an archaeologist with the DNR’s Forestry and Fish & Wildlife divisions, explained that when the DNR takes on building projects, it is standard procedure to have archaeologists examine the affected area for possible impacts to historical sites.
One such site was found at the DNR project underway at the local Fish & Wildlife office—a failing building along North Lakeshore Drive which is being torn down to make way for a new, energy-efficient, zero-carbon footprint facility.
Magner said he hesitates to label the site “prehistoric” because of the caveman connotation. “These were sophisticated people,” he explained. Instead, he calls it a pre-contact site—meaning before the native population had contact with Europeans.

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Amoeba Not Cause Alexandria Boy’s Death

Amoeba did not cause Alexandria boy’s death, lab tests say

SwimmersLaboratory testing has ruled out an amoeba as the cause of death of Hunter Boutain, a 14-year-old Alexandria boy who doctors originally thought died after contracting a rare condition while swimming in Lake Minnewaska.
The testing conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that Hunter Boutain did not die from suspected primary amoebic meningoencephalitis as reported in early July, but instead from streptococcal meningoencephalitis.
Photo by Pope County Tribune

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